Don’t Worry . . . Be Connected!

Wednesday-Quotes

Many women today constantly worry and ask themselves, “Are my career and children in conflict with one another?” Women now dominate the workplace, and at the same time they want their children to thrive. That tension creates guilt and lack of faith. Women wonder, “Is my success at work disrupting my children’s development?”

The key to overcoming this worry and fear is to stop multitasking – it doesn’t work, and to be present in the moment. In other words, when you’re with your children, really be with them. Make it quality time and connect at a deeper level. As a former teacher one pet-peeve that would upset me is when a child waited all day to see their parent and the parent shows up to pick up the child with a phone on the ear – not connecting with their “eager-to-see and love-you- child” .

Turn off the cell phone, computer and television so that you can devote all your attention to your children. Read to your child, go on great adventures together – even if that’s just consist of a trip through the backyard, and always tell them how much you love them. Do whatever you can to build memories with them.

If you’re going away on a business trip:

  • make a calendar
  • for the two weeks leading up to the trip
  • mark off the days together

This will help young children understand how days begin and end so that your time away won’t seem so long. Older children will experience less anxiety while you’re away because they’ll have had adequate preparation for the deployment. Then, while you’re away, set a time each day to do video conference calls (https://www.skype.com) with your children.

If you don’t travel but must work long hours, having a daily video conference with your children is a great way to build connection during the day. Ultimately, the more love and connection children feel, the less worry and fear you will have about impeding your children’s development.

Peace & Harmony ~ Cheryl

social-icons

Advertisements

The Healing Power of Pets for Seniors

seniors and pets 3

  • Is the senior set in their ways? If change isn’t your loved one’s cup of tea, then they may not be a good candidate. Adopting an animal usually affects a person’s whole daily routine.
  • Have they had a pet before? Amy Sherman, licensed therapist and author of Distress-Free Aging: A Boomer’s Guide to Creating a Fulfilled and Purposeful Life, thinks it’s best if the elderly person is an experienced owner. However, if they are open to a new and rewarding commitment, then first-timers can still make great owners.
  • Does the senior have any disabilities or functional limitations? Dogs can be wonderful companions who encourage a senior to walk and talk to others. But dogs can be a challenge for individuals with limited mobility. If taking a dog outside and exercising it is too trying, lower-maintenance animals like cats and birds may be preferable.
  • Would a therapeutic or emotional support animal be beneficial? If a person is very infirm or impaired, they may be a candidate for a specially trained therapy dog to help them function both at home and while on outings.
  • What age pet would be best? A puppy or kitten may not be ideal for elderly owners because of the intensive care and training they require. Furthermore, young pets may outlive their owners. It’s important to consider that some animals like birds have especially long life spans. On the other hand, a senior pet may have its own physical limitations and illnesses but they are usually well trained already.
  • What temperament would be a good fit for the senior? It is very important to research different breeds’ characteristics and interact with prospective adoptees to get a feel for their energy levels and personality. “Many older people might think they’d do better with a Jack Russell Terrier because it’s a small breed, but they are very, very, very high energy and require a great deal of effort and commitment,” says Susan Daffron, author of Happy Hound: Develop a Great Relationship with Your Adopted Dog or Puppy. While there are some general truths about specific breeds, every animal is unique.
  • Is the pet healthy? It’s important that any pet be examined by a professional prior to adoption. You don’t want to compromise an older person’s immune system since some pets carry diseases. Unhealthy pets can be difficult for seniors to handle both emotionally and financially.
  • One pet or two? While multiple pets can keep each other company, that may not be a good idea for an older person. Two animals may bond with each other rather than with their owner.
  • Are finances an issue? Pets are a significant long-term financial commitment. A small puppy can rack up more than $810 for food, medical care, toys and grooming just in its first year. A low-maintenance animal like a fish is less expensive, coming in at about $235, according to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Be sure to carefully consider a senior’s current budget before taking home any animal.
  • Is there a backup plan in place for the pet? It isn’t pleasant to think about, but owners must plan for the unexpected for their pets, too. If a senior had to go to the hospital, spend time in a short-term rehabilitation facility, move to a long-term care community or even passes away, what would happen to their animal(s)? Our golden years can be very unpredictable, so it’s important to have a contingency plan in place for our furry and feathered friends before an emergency strikes. Without one, beloved animals may wind up back in a shelter.

PETS_infographic

 

Books mentioned:

American-Society-for-the-Prevention-of-Cruelty-to-Animals-ASPCA_2

Peace & Harmony ~ Cheryl

Check me out here —–> social-icons

You Are Blessed . . .

teamwork quotes 1

Trust me when I tell you . . . I have all kinds of scrapes – bumps – cuts because of my failures.

But, I get up to heal the wound but leave the scar. The scar stays as a reminder of when I get to where I am supposed to be, how hard I fought to get there.

And . . . when I’m there I can sit back check out all the scrapes – scratches and say to myself “Suck it buttercup you have work to do to pay it forward” with Positivity.

I want my stories to be of my healing not my wounds.

           Falling is never your struggle

 

Peace & Harmony ~ Cheryl

Check me out at these places ———> social-icons

Functional Friday

What the Function?

*Simple – Easy – Not a lot of money to invest*

This is the way I like to clean and organize – Work smart not Hard!

Peace & Harmony ~ Cheryl

Like this post?  Pin Me! Please – Check me out here —-> social-icons

 

How to tell if you are a Arts & Crafter

Spices in glass jars with wooden lids on a worktop and herbs hanging from hooks.

If you get excited about the stuff  you will find when you click this link below  See the source image

https://www.ikea.com/us/en/ideas/

Then, you are a Arts & Crafter . . . nothing to be ashamed of, unless you do not have a project calendar to plan out how you will finish your art – tist creations!

I struggle too with my ADHD when I’m on sites such as Pinterest, Ikea and Martha Stewart. I get lost in collecting all the projects – that I must admit, I will never in my lifetime have the time to complete all the projects I have collected. But, I do want to finish a lot of them so I have created a Project Calendar.

(TIP: I set a timer when I am on sites such as Pinterest – it helps not to waste time)

I pick one or two projects every month – depending on the project. I put it on my calendar, I create my shopping list (if needed), I gather all my supplies and concentrate on that one or two projects for the month. Currently, I am planning out my projects so that I can I have the ones that are for Christmas gifts completed by December 15th.

Plan out your projects – remember Slow & Steady wins the race.

Peace & Harmony ~ Cheryl

Like this post? Pin Me! Please – – – – > social-icons