ASPCA, Best Care, Cat Lovers, Southeastern Region of CT

#NationalCatDay

This is our Scarlet ~ She is The Queen of our house . . . and yes everyone knows it!

She is also my daily Assistant (no one messes up paper like this chick), and she’s my best girl friend! I love her so much – I tell her that every morning. We adopted her from a local rescue organization, but really she rescued me!

Hug your kitty today – if its safe for you to do so . . . Lol

Peace & Harmony ~ Cheryl

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Best Care, Home, Interior Redesigner, Long term care, Mulitfunctional, Parents, Retro, southeastern ct, women business owners

Home Decorating In The 1940s

grab a cup and a seat Grab a seat and cup of coffee . . . it’s always on!

1940 Retro Decorating Style

Overshadowed by World War II, home design in the early 1940s was quite creative. As the European designers and artists fled to the United States, bringing many new ideas, development of new designs remained at a stalemate until shortly after the war ended. This was primarily due to material shortages. As production picked back up, people were ready to start new lives, which included Redesigns of the homes, especially rooms that would accompany guests.

Fabrics
Floral patterns were popular for bedrooms, living areas and wallpapered bathrooms. For the kitchen and dining room we had cherry or apple motifs, gingham, or checks, with roosters and chickens. I am still loving the roosters!

Furniture
While primarily mix with the 1950s, it was the 1940s that introduced chrome dinette sets with Formica tabletops, as well as glass drawer pulls, and chrome and vinyl stools, into the home. Bentwood furniture – made by soaking or steaming wood and bending it into curved shapes and patterns – were coming into fashion.

Flooring
Linoleum – especially in bold geometric patterns – was top choice for the kitchen. The material was strong and lasted many years, despite the fact it required lots of regular maintenance to keep it clean and shiny.

New Technologies
The 1940s brought to market the wooden radios and phonograph consoles, as well as fabric covered televisions to add luxury to a room. Families would often sit together to hear or see shows with their fashionable TV Trays (my grandmother bragged that hers had wheels), and guests would be included for momentous events.

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Colors
The decade was riding on the edge of two primary color palettes. Art Deco – included the ’20s through the early ’40s and reflected a shift to lighter and brighter, more neutral shades with metallic undertones. Pastels were a huge favorite for home interior decorators.

Overall Look
While the mid- to late-1940s introduced many new design concepts and materials, most households still kept it simple when it came to the overall look of a room. Primary focus was put on the family – open space was key. Even in modest homes, updates were often made to “enliven” the look in the home turning the focus from wartime; sad and dark rooms to peacetime; happy and colorful interiors. Clutter-free was key, even in family rooms, bathrooms, and bedrooms as everything had its place. Living a free and simply life with clarity and purpose . . . That’s the Life of The Successful!

Peace & Harmony ~ Cheryl

aging in place, Best Care, caregiver, Designers, Elder Care, Home Concierge, Long term care, southeastern ct

6 Facts About Age in Place Planning

Source: http://www.ageinplace.com

Great information if you are currently at this point where you need to make a decision for you and your family. When you are ready to sit down and properly plan for Age in Place Redesign, reach out to me at CC Home Concierge Co. I can help you plan – not just writing down dreams – make real plans.

Forget what’s gone – Appreciate what remains – Look forward to whats coming next

Peace & Harmony ~ Cheryl

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Best Care, Goals, Parents, southeastern ct, women business owners

Don’t Worry . . . Be Connected!

Wednesday-Quotes

Many women today constantly worry and ask themselves, “Are my career and children in conflict with one another?” Women now dominate the workplace, and at the same time they want their children to thrive. That tension creates guilt and lack of faith. Women wonder, “Is my success at work disrupting my children’s development?”

The key to overcoming this worry and fear is to stop multitasking – it doesn’t work, and to be present in the moment. In other words, when you’re with your children, really be with them. Make it quality time and connect at a deeper level. As a former teacher one pet-peeve that would upset me is when a child waited all day to see their parent and the parent shows up to pick up the child with a phone on the ear – not connecting with their “eager-to-see and love-you- child” .

Turn off the cell phone, computer and television so that you can devote all your attention to your children. Read to your child, go on great adventures together – even if that’s just consist of a trip through the backyard, and always tell them how much you love them. Do whatever you can to build memories with them.

If you’re going away on a business trip:

  • make a calendar
  • for the two weeks leading up to the trip
  • mark off the days together

This will help young children understand how days begin and end so that your time away won’t seem so long. Older children will experience less anxiety while you’re away because they’ll have had adequate preparation for the deployment. Then, while you’re away, set a time each day to do video conference calls (https://www.skype.com) with your children.

If you don’t travel but must work long hours, having a daily video conference with your children is a great way to build connection during the day. Ultimately, the more love and connection children feel, the less worry and fear you will have about impeding your children’s development.

Peace & Harmony ~ Cheryl

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ASPCA, Best Care, Pet Adoption, Pets

The Healing Power of Pets for Seniors

seniors and pets 3

  • Is the senior set in their ways? If change isn’t your loved one’s cup of tea, then they may not be a good candidate. Adopting an animal usually affects a person’s whole daily routine.
  • Have they had a pet before? Amy Sherman, licensed therapist and author of Distress-Free Aging: A Boomer’s Guide to Creating a Fulfilled and Purposeful Life, thinks it’s best if the elderly person is an experienced owner. However, if they are open to a new and rewarding commitment, then first-timers can still make great owners.
  • Does the senior have any disabilities or functional limitations? Dogs can be wonderful companions who encourage a senior to walk and talk to others. But dogs can be a challenge for individuals with limited mobility. If taking a dog outside and exercising it is too trying, lower-maintenance animals like cats and birds may be preferable.
  • Would a therapeutic or emotional support animal be beneficial? If a person is very infirm or impaired, they may be a candidate for a specially trained therapy dog to help them function both at home and while on outings.
  • What age pet would be best? A puppy or kitten may not be ideal for elderly owners because of the intensive care and training they require. Furthermore, young pets may outlive their owners. It’s important to consider that some animals like birds have especially long life spans. On the other hand, a senior pet may have its own physical limitations and illnesses but they are usually well trained already.
  • What temperament would be a good fit for the senior? It is very important to research different breeds’ characteristics and interact with prospective adoptees to get a feel for their energy levels and personality. “Many older people might think they’d do better with a Jack Russell Terrier because it’s a small breed, but they are very, very, very high energy and require a great deal of effort and commitment,” says Susan Daffron, author of Happy Hound: Develop a Great Relationship with Your Adopted Dog or Puppy. While there are some general truths about specific breeds, every animal is unique.
  • Is the pet healthy? It’s important that any pet be examined by a professional prior to adoption. You don’t want to compromise an older person’s immune system since some pets carry diseases. Unhealthy pets can be difficult for seniors to handle both emotionally and financially.
  • One pet or two? While multiple pets can keep each other company, that may not be a good idea for an older person. Two animals may bond with each other rather than with their owner.
  • Are finances an issue? Pets are a significant long-term financial commitment. A small puppy can rack up more than $810 for food, medical care, toys and grooming just in its first year. A low-maintenance animal like a fish is less expensive, coming in at about $235, according to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Be sure to carefully consider a senior’s current budget before taking home any animal.
  • Is there a backup plan in place for the pet? It isn’t pleasant to think about, but owners must plan for the unexpected for their pets, too. If a senior had to go to the hospital, spend time in a short-term rehabilitation facility, move to a long-term care community or even passes away, what would happen to their animal(s)? Our golden years can be very unpredictable, so it’s important to have a contingency plan in place for our furry and feathered friends before an emergency strikes. Without one, beloved animals may wind up back in a shelter.

PETS_infographic

 

Books mentioned:

American-Society-for-the-Prevention-of-Cruelty-to-Animals-ASPCA_2

Peace & Harmony ~ Cheryl

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